With 2016 fast nearing its end, we took some time out to compile a list of a few of our favourite things here at Intentional this year.

Coffee: Padre – Daddy’s Girl. For those of you who like their coffee strong, Daddy’s Girl blend makes a killer latte. Plus in recent months has been a favourite via Aeropress too. Find it here. Meal: Crispy Eggs @ Mr Hendricks. In a year dominated by talk of the classic Smashed Avo, it was impressive to find a brunch spot doing something innovative that actually added to the flavour, not just being different to be different. Oh & guess which coffee they serve? Wine: 2014 Taylors Clare Valley Shiraz. Saying yes to a sommelier AirBnb guest might have made for some slow mornings for one of our Intentional team in 2016, but it also helped uncover an absolute gem. Not many bottles left out there now! Book: Team of Teams: General Stanley McChrystal. The marketing book of the year that has nothing to do with marketing – how the US military transformed their very DNA from being a war machine that fought one country to another, to becoming a decentralised team of teams that could respond to small terror cell insurgencies. The truths contained in here are eerily parallel for brands needing to change their DNA to market in a global, socially connected world. TV Show: Halt & Catch Fire. Movie: Hunt for the Wilderpeople.  Movie Soundtrack: In the heart of the sea. Album: 

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Would you set a fox to guard the henhouse?

If you’ve been using Facebook and solely relying on their data to optimise, then this is what you’ve actually allowed.

Facebook came under fire yet again with their recent admission that they have again been overstating

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The biggest news hitting online advertising circles in the last few days (though notably absent from the Adwords blog itself) is that Google is removing something that has been present in Adwords since day 1 - right hand side ads. Right hand side ads (traditionally ad positions 4 through to 8 on the Search Results page) were traditionally the bastion of advertisers who had tight Cost per Conversion/Acquisition limits - here on the right hand side, advertisers could bid low and know that even though they may not get click volume, they could get profit from these cheaper clicks. Why would Google remove the ability for advertisers to execute this perfectly valid strategy?