The biggest news hitting online advertising circles in the last few days (though notably absent from the Adwords blog itself) is that Google is removing something that has been present in Adwords since day 1 - right hand side ads. Right hand side ads (traditionally ad positions 4 through to 8 on the Search Results page) were traditionally the bastion of advertisers who had tight Cost per Conversion/Acquisition limits - here on the right hand side, advertisers could bid low and know that even though they may not get click volume, they could get profit from these cheaper clicks. Why would Google remove the ability for advertisers to execute this perfectly valid strategy?
We started off our Year in Review yesterday, by looking at our most viewed and shared Adwords posts for 2015. Today, continue our Year in Review by looking at our most popular Facebook posts for 2015 ...
As part of our Countdown to 2016, we're assembling our best posts for 2015. Today we kick off our Year in Review with the most popular posts about Adwords for 2015 - as voted by you (ok, Google Analytics ;)
“Every great institution is the lengthened shadow of a single man. His character determines the character of the organization.” — Ralph Waldo Emerson Google was founded by Computer Science majors Larry Page and Sergey Brin (also a Maths prodigy). Facebook was founded by Computer Science and Social Psychologist major Mark Zuckerberg. Google is famous for ...
90%+ of searches made in Australia are via Google. 1 in every 3 minutes spent on a mobile device in Australia is spent on ...
The ability for online advertisers to optimise their advertising is not new. Almost 100 years ago, Claude Hopkins, the father of Direct Marketing, outlined all the principles of ad optimisation - still relevant today - in his classic book, Scientific Advertising. The gift of Pay Per Click advertising is that online marketers no longer need to wait weeks to count returned snail mail coupons - we can now optimise in real time. In fact, the pendulum has actually swung the other way ...
Facebook from day one, has always enjoyed one seemingly trivial (back in the day) benefit: users login as themselves and for 99% of users, only have a single account. Google users however can have: No logins. ie. when simply using Google search, Multiple logins. ie. personal and work gmail, or Multiple accounts for different services (eg. one account for Gmail, one for Adwords/Analytics) What this means for Google is that ...